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2022 NFL Draft Prospects: Rookie Wide Receivers Rankings

We compiled the wide receiver rankings from 6 of the top sports websites and came with our points-based wide receivers rankings. Here are the best rookie wide receivers prospects heading into the 2022 NFL Draft.

RESOURCES: Player Ratings by PFF.com | Player Contracts by Spotrac.com | Stats by ESPN.com | Player Bios/Analysis by NFL.com

YOU CAN ACCESS EVERY ‘STATE OF THE FRANCHISE’ ARTICLE FOR FREE. // 2022 NFL Draft Top Prospects: DEFENSIVE PLAYERSWRS, OL, TES, QBS, RBS

With Super Bowl LVI and the 2022 NFL Scouting Combine in the rearview and the 2022 NFL Draft on the horizon (April 28th), it’s time to look toward the next group of talent to hit the pro ranks. Below is our rankings list of the top prospects at the wide receiver position in the 2022 NFL Draft class.

To make our rankings we reviewed all the major rankings out there [drafttek.com, draftkings.com, nfldraftbuzz.com, cbssports.com, si.com, & walterfootball.com]. We then allocated points to each player in each ranking to come up with the most comprehensive list with the highest power.

Check back with us after the draft for our thoughts and fantasy football projections.

TOP 20 WIDE RECEIVERS in the 2022 NFL DRAFT

Ht: 6’0”     Wt: 183 lbs
Arms: 32”  Hands: 9 7/8”
School: Ohio State
Prospect Grade: 6.50 
Next Gen Score: 87

Production (2021): 70 rec | 1,058 yds | 12 td 

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:   4.38 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:    36
Broad Jump:      123
3 Cone Drill:         
20 Yd Shuttle:   4.36
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Wilson grew up around Columbus but his family moved to Austin, Texas, for his dad’s job in 2011. He starred at Lake Travis High School and earned the All-American Bowl Man of the Year Award as a senior (1,151 yards, 19 TDs despite missing time due to injury) for his community service, education and athletic distinction. He also received Division I college basketball scholarship offers. His father, Kenny, is among the top scorers in Davidson’s storied history. The five-star prospect enrolled at Ohio State a semester early and played in all 14 games as a key reserve true freshman in the fall (30-423-14.4, five TDs receiving: 14-86-6.1 punt returns). Wilson started all eight games for the Buckeyes in 2020, receiving first-team All-Big Ten Conference accolades (43-723-16.8, six TDs receiving; 7-51-7.3 punt returns). He was a second-team Associated Press All-American and second-team all-conference selection in 2021 after tying for eighth in the FBS with 12 receiving touchdowns in 11 starts (70-1,058-15.1) and returning punts (13-68-5.2). Wilson missed one game in concussion protocol during the 2021 season and then opted out of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Wilson’s game is lacking in polish, but some scouts believe his play strength and run-after-catch ability make him a more valuable draft commodity than Ohio State teammate Chris Olave. He’s a linear, inside/outside receiver with trouble eluding press cleanly and is very inefficient with routes over the first two levels. His long speed is good, but the acceleration burst is what makes him such an effective separator in space. He might not be smooth getting there, but he has eye-popping ball skills when it’s time to go make a play. Wilson needs to work on his ability to consistently uncover on all three levels, but he has the traits to become a very good WR2 if he tightens up areas of concern.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6’4”      Wt: 219 lbs
Arms: 33”   Hands: 9 3/8”
School: USC
Prospect Grade: 6.34 
Next Gen Score: 87

Production (2021): 88 rec | 1,084 yds | 7 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash: __ 
Bench Press: __
Vertical Jump: __
Broad Jump: __
3 Cone Drill: __
20 Yd Shuttle: __
60 Yd Shuttle: __

Player Bio

London was an all-state pick in football and basketball for Moorpark High School in California and also played AAU hoops. He suited up for two games for the USC basketball team in the 2019-20 season, though he missed five games with a viral illness in January. His football prowess is what has turned heads, though, beginning with a strong true freshman season in 2019 (93-567-14.5, five TDs in 13 games, nine starts). London led the Trojans with 502 receiving yards (33 receptions, 15.2 per rec., three TDs) while starting all six games in 2020, receiving second-team All-Pac-12 accolades from league coaches. London missed the end of the 2021 season with a fractured right ankle but impressed Associated Press voters (who selected him as a third-team All-American) and league coaches (Offensive Player of the Year, first-team all-conference) by leading his squad with 88 receptions and 1,084 receiving yards (12.3 per rec.) and tying for the team lead with seven scores in just eight starts.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Big, long possession receiver with the ability to play outside or from the slot. London lacks desired top-end speed and separation quickness to open clear throwing windows but plays a mature, savvy brand of ball. The game slows down for him when the ball comes out. London was a top-flight basketball player so angles to the ball, body positioning and high-pointing come very naturally to him, turning a 50-50 ball into a 70-30 advantage. While he has the size and skill to dominate the catch phase, his one-speed route-running and lack of separation burst means a career full of contested catches. London’s pro career would benefit from playing with a diverse receiving corps that allows play-callers to play to London’s strengths.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

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Ht: 6’2”             Wt: 225 lbs
Arms: 33 1/2”  Hands: 9 7/8”
School: Arkansas
Prospect Grade: 6.50 
Next Gen Score: 88

Production (2021): 66 rec | 1,104 yds | 11 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:   4.55 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:    33
Broad Jump:      122
3 Cone Drill:      7.28
20 Yd Shuttle:      
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Burks was a four-star recruit who chose his home state Arkansas over Clemson, Florida State, Michigan and many other schools. He showed toughness during his days at Warren High School, playing with a cast on his right hand as a sophomore but still managing to catch 11 passes for 285 yards and three scores with one hand after one of the team’s other receivers was injured. That talent showed through as a true freshman with the Razorbacks in 2019, as he led the team with 475 receiving yards (29 catches, 16.4 per rec.) and returned kicks (10-226-22.6 kickoffs; 12-130-10.8 punts). SEC coaches named him second-team all-conference in 2020 as he again paced his squad in receiving (51-820-16.1, seven TDs). Burks finished his career as a first-team All-SEC selection in 2021 (66-1,104-16.7, 11 TDs in 12 starts), setting a school record with six 100-yard receiving efforts. He opted out of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Big, smooth and natural, Burks possesses the versatility to operate from wherever you want and get to wherever you need no matter the competition. He’s a mismatch receiver combining size, strength and competitiveness similar to the Titans’ A.J. Brown, but his speed testing at the NFL Scouting Combine did not meet expectations. Arkansas benefitted by putting the ball in his hands from a variety of alignments and there is no reason to believe NFL play-callers won’t benefit from doing the same. The tape is extremely exciting with real NFL skills jumping off the screen, but his potential to become a high-volume, three-level target is a little more cloudy after a relatively disappointing showing at the combine.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 1 1/2”      Wt: 179
Arms: 32 1/8”   Hands: 9 1/4”
School: Alabama
Prospect Grade: 6.48 
Next Gen Score: 92

Production (2021): 79 rec | 1,572 yds | 15 td

40 Yard Dash: __ 
Bench Press: __
Vertical Jump: __
Broad Jump: __
3 Cone Drill: __
20 Yd Shuttle: __
60 Yd Shuttle: __

Player Bio

Williams is a St. Louis native who not only scored 22 touchdowns as a senior at Cardinal Ritter College Prep but also broke Ezekiel Elliott’s state record in the 300-meter hurdles. He signed with Ohio State and played in all 14 games as a reserve and on special teams (6-112-18.7, one TD) in 2019. Williams started six of eight games played in 2020, but caught just nine passes for 154 yards (17.1 per rec.) and two scores in a deep receiver rotation including Jaxon Smith-Njigba, Chris Olave and Garrett Wilson. He decided to enter the transfer portal and signed with Alabama for 2021 -– a school he strongly considered during his high school recruitment. Williams made the correct choice this time around, grabbing 79 passes, ranking fifth in the FBS with 1,572 receiving yards and tying for third with 15 receiving touchdowns in 15 starts. He was named a first-team Associated Press All-American, first-team All-SEC receiver and Co-SEC Special Teams Player of the Year (10-352-35.2, two TDs kick returns), and a finalist for the Biletnikoff Award, which honors the nation’s top receiver. Williams’ season did not end on a high note, however, as he injured his knee against Georgia in the national title game.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Linear route-runner with electric long speed to impact a game as a home-run hitter or decoy drawing defenders away from other elements of the offense. Williams ruins man coverage but faces some limitations. He has issues getting off press cleanly and might require some scheming to help get off the mark cleanly against certain corners. Catch toughness can be inconsistent when contested or in heavily trafficked areas. He has all the juice to find consistent separation on vertical, over and post/corner routes and could see monstrous production if paired with a high-end talent at quarterback. The ACL tear could play a role in determining his ultimate draft destination, but it’s unlikely to change his game.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 0”            Wt: 187
Arms: 31 1/8”   Hands: 9 1/2”
School: Ohio State
Prospect Grade: 6.46 
Next Gen Score: 84

Production (2021): 65 rec | 936 yds | 13 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.39 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:     32
Broad Jump:       124
3 Cone Drill:         
20 Yd Shuttle:      
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Olave (pronounced oh-LAH-vay) showed glimpses of his talent as a true freshman in 2018 (12-197-16.4, three TDs in 14 games), just one year after excelling (1,764 yards, 26 TDs) as a senior at Mission Hills High School in California — he was ineligible to play his junior year due to a transfer issue. He gained 15 pounds of solid muscle between his freshman and sophomore seasons at Ohio State, and there was an immediate benefit. Olave garnered third-team All-Big Ten accolades, becoming an essential target for Heisman Trophy finalist quarterback Justin Fields as the team leader in receiving yards and touchdowns (48-840-17.5, 12 TDs in 14 games, six starts). Olave showed maturity at the end of the season, taking the blame for slipping on a route where Fields threw an interception at the end of the national semifinal game against Clemson. He was the Buckeyes’ top receiving option in 2020, finishing the season among the national leaders in receptions and receiving yards (50-729-14.6) while starting all seven games to earn first-team all-conference honors for the FBS runner-up. He received second-team Associated Press All-American and first-team all-conference notice in his final year, tying for sixth in the FBS with 13 receiving TDs to become the school’s all-time leader in the category. His 35 beat out NFL stars David Boston, Cris Carter and Santonio Holmes. Olave caught 65 passes for 936 yards (14.4 per rec.) in 12 starts for the Buckeyes, opting out of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft. He was also named a finalist for the Senior CLASS Award for excellence on and off the field.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

The quiet storm of the Ohio State wide receiver corps, Olave is smooth, steady and makes things happen. His movements are fluid and easy from snap to the catch and all points between. He’s fast but efficient and plays with the bend and foot agility to uncover on all three levels. Olave possesses natural, well-rounded ball skills but needs to add play strength to ward off the physical challenges that are headed his way. His play traits should allow for success beyond the scheme and talent advantages surrounding him at Ohio State. He is an inside/outside hybrid appealing to offenses looking for a field-stretcher with the ability to take on a sizable catch load.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 4”             Wt: 208 lbs
Arms: 32 1/2”   Hands: 10 1/8”
School: North Dakota State
Prospect Grade: 6.21 
Next Gen Score: 75

Production (2021): 43 rec | 800 yds | 7 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.36 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:   38.5
Broad Jump:       136
3 Cone Drill:         
20 Yd Shuttle:      
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Watson has been one of the most explosive receivers at the FCS level since getting on the field at NDSU out of Plant High School in Tampa. As a redshirt freshman, he helped the Bison win yet another national title by contributing in 14 games (9-165-18.3 receiving; two starts). Watson was a second-team All-Missouri Valley Football Conference selection in 2019, leading the eventual national champs with 34 receptions for 732 yards (ranking fourth in the FCS with 21.5 yards per reception) while scoring six times in 16 games (11 starts; also 13-162-12.5, one TD rushing; 4-70-17.5 kick returns). He was a first-team All-MVFC selection at receiver (19-442-23.3, one TD receiving: 21-116-5.5 rushing) and a second-team return specialist (10-338-33.8, two TD kick returns) in 2020, playing in 10 games with eight starts between the team’s lone game in the fall and its 2021 spring schedule. Watson garnered second-team Associated Press FCS All-American accolades (43-801-18.6, seven TDs receiving; 15-114-7.6, one TD rushing; 10-227-22.7 kick returns in 12 games, 10 starts) in 2021, as well as a first-team all-conference nod. He missed the team’s first three playoff games before starting in the national title game victory over Montana State. Christian’s father, Tazim Wajid Wajed (formerly Tim Watson), was a defensive back at Howard and had a five-year NFL career (1993-97). His brother, Tre, played linebacker at two Big Ten Schools (Illinois, Maryland) and in the XFL, and his uncle, Cedric, played football at Marshall.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

A receiver prospect with intriguing measurables and a strong belief in the team aspect of the game, Watson possesses an alluring combination of size and speed. He showed off improved route running and catch strength in 2021. He is much more gifted than his opposition was at NDSU and needs to prove he can elevate his game against bigger, faster players at the next level. He plays hard and fast but needs to add a few more pounds and learn to impose his frame on the coverage. He’s a field-stretching option requiring a linear route tree and projects as a capable WR3/4 with more work.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

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Ht: 6′ 3”             Wt: 195
Arms: 32 3/8”   Hands: 8 3/4”
School: Georgia
Prospect Grade: 6.23 
Next Gen Score: 78

Production (2021): 5 rec | 107 yds | 0 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.47 
Bench Press:        
Vertical Jump:    33
Broad Jump:      125
3 Cone Drill:        
20 Yd Shuttle:     
60 Yd Shuttle:     

Player Bio

Pickens made an instant impact in his first year in Athens, landing on the SEC All-Freshman Team and sharing the team’s Offensive Newcomer of the Year Award after leading the squad with 49 receptions, 727 receiving yards (14.8 per rec.) and eight receiving touchdowns. He played in all 14 games with two starts, though he was suspended for the first half of the Georgia Tech game for violation of team rules and then got into a fight with a Georgia Tech player that cost him the first half of the SEC Championship Game against LSU (the league could have ruled him out for the entire game). The top 25 overall recruit nationally from Hoover High School in Alabama started all eight games in 2020, leading the team with eight touchdowns (36-513-14.2). He tore an ACL in spring 2021 practices but returned to play in the last four games (5-107-21.4) of the team’s national championship season, stretching out for a 52-yard pass in the title game. Pickens was on the A.J. Green Family Football Scholarship while at Georgia, named after the former Georgia star and long-time NFL receiver. Pickens’ brother, Chris Humes, played football at Arkansas State and in the Canadian Football League for Winnipeg for two years.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Lanky perimeter wideout with exciting ball skills but in desperate need of additional play strength and a clean bill of health. Resilient to make it back so quickly after an ACL tear, but needs to show quick-cutting ability for route-running. Pickens possesses borderline elite ball skills with in-air adjustments, strong hands and an enormous catch radius. However, he fails to put defenders on his hip and command the catch space to make his work less cluttered. The routes need more polish and physicality but he has the athletic ability to become a viable target on all three levels as a likely Day 2 draft pick with a little wider gap between ceiling and floor than NFL teams might like.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 5′ 11”             Wt: 178 lbs
Arms: 30 3/4”   Hands: 9 1/2”
School: Penn State
Prospect Grade: 6.33 
Next Gen Score: 82

Production (2021): 91 rec | 1,182 yds | 12 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.43 
Bench Press:        
Vertical Jump:    36
Broad Jump:      121
3 Cone Drill:      7.28
20 Yd Shuttle:     
60 Yd Shuttle:     

Player Bio

Jahan (pronounced juh-HAHN) Dotson made an outstanding one-handed catch against Ohio State during the 2020 season, saying afterward: “I approach that (ball) as a million dollars. It’s a million dollars in the air. If you want it, you go get it.” Big Ten coaches appreciated his financial acumen, voting him third-team all-conference at receiver (PSU leader with 52 receptions, 884 yards, eight scores with 17.0 yards per catch in nine starts) and honorable mention as a punt returner (8-197-24.6, one TD). Dotson capped off his career with 2021 third-team Associated Press All-American and second-team All-Big Ten accolades at receiver, leading Penn State with 91 receptions and 1,182 receiving yards and tying for eighth in the country with 12 receiving scores in 12 starts (opted out of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft). He also received third-team all-league notice for his return abilities (14-104-7.4 punt returns). Dotson initially committed to UCLA as a top 150 overall recruit nationally but eventually decided to stay close to Nazareth, where he grew up. He played in eight games (12-203-15.6) with starts in the final four contests as a true freshman before starting all 13 appearances in 2019 (27-488-18.1, five TDs; 2-39-19.5 punt returns). Gloria Bigelow, Dotson’s grandmother, with whom he was very close, passed away in April 2020. He wears a T-shirt with her image on the front for each game.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Finesse wideout with good speed and great athleticism who is fully operational on all three levels of the field. Dotson’s passing scheme was well-designed and allowed for clear access to space for most of the season. His route-running is smooth but features speed changes and his in-air athleticism and ball skills look effortless. His confidence and competitiveness are just average against physical coverage and he’s likely to see a lot more press looks as a pro. Dotson has inside/outside starting talent but a lack of physicality could prevent him from taking over games at the same rate we saw at Penn State.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 5′ 11”            Wt: 187 lbs
Arms: 30 5/8”   Hands: 9 1/4”
School: Alabama
Prospect Grade: 6.18 
Next Gen Score: 80

Production (2021): 96 rec | 1,142 yds | 8 td

40 Yard Dash: __ 
Bench Press: __
Vertical Jump: __
Broad Jump: __
3 Cone Drill: __
20 Yd Shuttle: __
60 Yd Shuttle: __

Player Bio

Metchie was diagnosed with a slightly enlarged heart in high school, but doctors gave him clearance to play football. He became a four-star recruit who signed with Alabama after one year at a prep school. He contributed in all 13 games in 2019 (4-23-5.8 receiving) but then became a large part of the team’s national championship run in 2020. Metchie stepped in for an injured Jaylen Waddle to start 11 of 13 games, catching 55 passes for 916 yards (16.7 per rec.) and six scores. He started 13 games in 2021, garnering second-team All-SEC honors with a team-high 96 receptions (1,142 yards, 11.9 per rec., eight TDs) before suffering a torn ACL in the conference title game and missing the team’s playoff run. Metchie was born in Taiwan — his mother is Taiwanese and his father is from Nigeria. His family moved to Ghana when he was young, then emigrated to Canada when he was 6 years old. Metchie left Canada to play high school football in Maryland.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

NFL slot projection with good polish but a lack of noteworthy elements in his game. Metchie has decent size but average play speed. He’s proficient in more sophisticated routes but lacks explosiveness to separate and will have to prove he can become a more physical wideout to win contested catches at the pro level. He can play multiple receiver spots and has the ability to take what the scheme provides him. As long as his recovery from an ACL tear goes smoothly, Metchie has a chance to become a starting slot receiver with a relatively modest ceiling.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 1”             Wt: 212 lbs
Arms: 31 7/8”   Hands: 9 1/4”
School: Purdue
Prospect Grade: 6.11 
Next Gen Score: 81

Production (2021): 93 rec | 1,286 yds | 6 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.65 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:     33
Broad Jump:       118
3 Cone Drill:       7.14
20 Yd Shuttle:    4.57
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

As a four-star recruit, Indiana’s 2018 Gatorade Player of the Year and a star basketball player at Warren Central High School in Indianapolis, Bell could have matriculated anywhere in the country. He stayed close to home, however, to play for offensive-minded head coach Jeff Brohm. Not surprisingly, Bell got on the field immediately for the Boilermakers, starting nine of 12 games played and tying for 10th nationally with 7.2 receptions per game (86-1,035-12.0, seven TDs receiving; 3-12-4.0, one TD rushing in 12 games, nine starts) to earn Freshman All-American, Big Ten Freshman of the Year and honorable mention all-conference accolades. He was again the team’s top target in 2020, garnering first-team All-Big Ten notice by scoring eight touchdowns in six starts and tying for fourth in the FBS with 8.8 receptions per game (53-625-11.8). Bell completed his career in West Lafayette as a first-team Associated Press All-American, Big Ten Conference Receiver of the Year and Biletnikoff Award finalist after grabbing 93 receptions for 1,286 yards (13.8 per catch) and six scores to lead his squad over 11 starts. He missed one game with a concussion and opted out of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Inside/outside target who is more smooth than sudden in uncovering over the first two levels of the field. Bell is like a crafty pitcher with a limited fastball but a variety of pitches to get hitters out. He wins with process over speed and has an ability to keep man coverage off-balance with rhythmic route-running and detailed footwork. While the tape has several elements to excite the viewer, the lack of functional explosiveness, speed and change of direction he showed at the NFL Scouting Combine simply can’t be ignored. He’s a willing worker in the middle of the field and has a savvy element to his game, but he’ll have to prove he’s better than his testing suggested as a Day 3 prospect.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

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Ht: 5′ 10”   Wt: 195 lbs 
Arms: 31”   Hands: 10 1/4”
School: Western Michigan
Prospect Grade: 6.19 
Next Gen Score: 77

Production (2021): 95 rec | 1,292 yds | 10 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.41 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:   34.5
Broad Jump:       125
3 Cone Drill:       7.13
20 Yd Shuttle:    4.32
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Moore was a two-time first-team All-MAC selection for the Broncos during his three years in Kalamazoo. As a true freshman, he earned the first honor by starting the final 12 games of the year, playing in all 13 contests, tying for the team lead with 51 receptions and leading his squad with 802 receiving yards (13.6 per rec.) while scoring three times. He was a second-team all-conference pick in 2020 (25-388-15.5, three TDs in five starts) before ascending to the top of the league in 2021, tying for ninth in the FBS with 95 receptions for a team-high 1,292 yards (13.6 per rec.) and 10 scores in 12 starts.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Productive three-year starter with decent athleticism and good ball skills but just average separation potential. Moore is courageous working into the teeth of the defense and tenacious to come up with contested catches from anywhere on the field. He’s a one-note route-runner lacking acceleration out of break points but showed off impressive vertical speed at the NFL Scouting Combine. His ball skills and toughness create opportunities as a reliable target and capable route-runner from release to whistle. His best fit is from the slot, but long-term success will depend on his ability to keep fine-tuning his craft.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 1”             Wt: 194 lbs
Arms: 32 1/4”   Hands: 10”
School: South Alabama
Prospect Grade: 6.24 
Next Gen Score: 81

Production (2021): 82 rec | 1,474 yds | 8 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.49 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:     36
Broad Jump:       123
3 Cone Drill:       7.08
20 Yd Shuttle:      
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Tolbert was only a two-star recruit out of Mobile’s McGill-Toolen High School, and he didn’t get a chance to prove himself during his first year at his hometown school because of an injury suffered in preseason camp. He played in all 12 games as a reserve the following year (5-60-12.0) before breaking out as a sophomore. Tolbert led the Jaguars in 2019 with six receiving touchdowns and 19.3 yards per reception (27-521 in 12 starts). His play in 2020 really grabbed scouts’ attention, as he ranked seventh in the FBS with 1,085 receiving yards (64 receptions, 17.0 per rec., eight scores) to earn first-team All-Sun Belt notice. Instead of heading to the NFL, Tolbert instead stayed at USA to work with transfer passer Jake Bentley (South Carolina, Utah), who he already knew through working with Mobile-based quarterback trainer David Morris. His efforts paid off, as he was named the 2021 Sun Belt Conference Player of the Year and first-team all-league after setting school records with 82 receptions and eight touchdowns in 12 starts. Tolbert ranked sixth in the FBS with 1,474 receiving yards (18.0 per rec.) and also set school career records with 178 receptions and 3,140 receiving yards.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Silky smooth athlete who has morphed into a monster over the last two seasons. Tolbert is a high-character prospect with skill elements that are dripping with NFL potential. He gave work to everyone he faced, including SEC cover corners at Tennessee. His three-sport background offers unique perspective to pull from at his position, and his route-running gives him a leg up in camp battles early on. His traits, talent and production should push him up the board, and dialing up the competitive spirit could turn him into a top-flight WR2.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 3”      Wt: 211 lbs
Arms: 33”   Hands: 9”
School: Cincinnati
Prospect Grade: 5.99 
Next Gen Score: 72

Production (2021): 52 rec | 884 yds | 8 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.41 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:   40.5
Broad Jump:       129
3 Cone Drill:       7.13
20 Yd Shuttle:    4.28
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Pierce played on special teams for the Bearcats as true freshman in 2018, recording six coverage tackles and shifting from receiver to linebacker during bowl game practices. He got his chance to shine on offense the following fall, however, starting 13 of 14 contests and leading the team with 652 receiving yards (37 receptions, 17.6 per rec., two TDs). Pierce led UC with 18.5 yards per reception in 2020 (17-315, three TDs) but was limited to four starts in six games due to a shoulder injury. He was a second-team All-American Athletic Conference selection in 2021 as Cincinnati’s top receiver (52-884-17.0, seven TDs in 14 games, 13 starts). Pierce was also named a first-team Academic All-American by the sports information directors. He lettered in football, volleyball, basketball and track at Glenbard West High School in the Chicago area. Pierce’s father, Greg, played football at Northwestern and his mother, Stephanie, was on the Wildcats’ volleyball squad. His brother, Justin, played basketball at William & Mary and North Carolina.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Pierce was a mismatch as a deep-ball target at Cincinnati, but is more likely to be tabbed as a possession receiver with the ability to create some downfield trouble as a pro. He plays a physical brand of ball and has combat-catch toughness, which is important because he’s not an elusive route runner. He can work underneath or challenge a bigger, slower cornerback deep, but the route tree is going to be limited. Some players have traits that don’t show up on the field, but Pierce utilizes both his physical and athletic gifts. He has backup potential with zone-beater and red-zone value, and will likely play on special teams.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 4”             Wt: 205 lbs
Arms: 32 1/8”   Hands: 9 5/8”
School: Clemson
Prospect Grade: 5.89 
Next Gen Score: 77

Production (2021): 46 rec | 514 yds | 3 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:     
Bench Press:      11
Vertical Jump:   
Broad Jump:      
3 Cone Drill:       
20 Yd Shuttle:    
60 Yd Shuttle:    

Player Bio

Ross became a big-time playmaker for the Tigers in his first two years though surgery on a congenital spinal fusion condition sidelined him for the 2020 season. He came back strong in 2021 by starting 10 games (46-514-11.2, three TDs) then opting of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft. As a sophomore, Ross was named honorable mention All-ACC selection after leading his squad in receptions (66-865-13.1, eight TDs) as a 14-game starter. He led Clemson in receiving yards as a true freshman without starting a game, catching 46 passes for 1,000 yards (21.7 per rec.) and nine scores in 15 games for the national champions. Ross was a top 50 national recruit and an Alabama Mr. Football Award finalist at Phenix City High School, but he turned down the Crimson Tide to sign with the Tigers. Ross’ mother, Charay Franklin, joined the Navy after high school and has served in the Alabama National Guard.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Ross returned from spinal surgery that kept him out for the entire 2020 season, but it’s not yet clear if he can return to the same form he showed in 2018 and 2019. While he has expanded his route tree, Ross is most effective in a passing attack that features vertical throws, where his stride length and build-up speed will work in his favor. He looked smooth catching on the move and still has an up-and-over advantage on jump balls, but his ability to elude press requires further examination. He’s a likely backup who can provide value at all three receiver positions.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

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Ht: 5′ 8”      Wt: 170 lbs
Arms: 30”   Hands: 9 1/4”
School: Memphis
Prospect Grade: 5.92 
Next Gen Score: 72

Production (2021): 74 rec | 1,149 yds | 8 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.32 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:     39
Broad Jump:       135
3 Cone Drill:      6.65
20 Yd Shuttle:   4.07
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Austin is a Memphis native who always wanted to play for the Tigers. He joined the football team as a preferred walk-on (just like NFL wideout Anthony Miller) and the track squad as a sprinter. He earned 2019 second-team All-American track honors in the 4×100-meter relay and several All-American Athletic Conference honors in various events, and would have earned a track scholarship but the Bear Bryant rule prevents student-athletes from getting a scholarship in another sport while playing football). As a redshirt freshman with the football team in 2018, Austin played in 11 games as a reserve (2-24-12.0 receiving; 83-yard TD in his only carry). He played in 13 games off the bench in 2019 (17-315-18.5, three TDs receiving; 4-3-0.8, one TD rushing), finally getting his scholarship after a team win against Houston in November. Austin was a first-team All-AAC selection in 2020 after ranking sixth in the FBS with 11 receiving touchdowns and eighth with 1,053 receiving yards on 63 receptions for 16.7 yards per catch. He also scored on one punt return that season (20-188-9.4). He led the Tigers in receiving again in 2021 (74-1,149-15.5, eight TDs in 12 games, including 11 starts) to receive first-team all-conference notice while also scoring on his only rushing attempt (69 yards) and on a controversial 94-yard punt return (5-135-27.0 on punt returns for the year). Austin opted out of the Hawai’i Bowl but the game was eventually cancelled as the Hawai’i football program had COVID-19 issues.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Productive playmaker with below-average size but above-average heart. Austin is below the acceptable size standards many teams have at wide receiver, but he is fearless, versatile and fast. He has proven he can handle the catch-and-run duties necessary in Memphis’ quick game. He has the rapid-fire foot quickness and loose hips to take on a more complex route tree as an NFL slot target. His lack of size shows up in contested catch battles so he will need to fine-tune the route-running to improve his catch windows. Austin’s ability to work all three levels of the field and handle punt-return duties increases his odds of becoming a Day 3 pick.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 2”             Wt: 201 lbs
Arms: 32 1/4”   Hands: 10”
School: Nevada
Prospect Grade: 5.84 
Next Gen Score: 72 

Production (2021): 80 rec | 1,109 yds | 11 td

40 Yard Dash: __ 
Bench Press: __
Vertical Jump: __
Broad Jump: __
3 Cone Drill: __
20 Yd Shuttle: __
60 Yd Shuttle: __

Player Bio

Former Nevada receivers coach Eric Scott coached Doubs (pronounced dubs) at Jefferson High School in Los Angeles and knew him from Snoop Dogg’s Youth Football League. Scott took over recruiting for Nevada in 2017 and made sure to sign Doubs. He returned an 80-yard punt for a touchdown on his first collegiate touch, eventually starting nine of 13 games in his true freshman season (43-562-13.1, two TDs receiving; 1-22-22.0 kick returns; 6-107-17.8, one TD punt returns). Doubs was an honorable mention All-Mountain West Conference pick and the team’s Most Valuable Player in 2019, leading the squad with 14.8 yards per reception (44-649, four TDs; 8-86-10.8 punt returns in 11 games, eight starts). MWC coaches voted him first-team all-conference in 2020 as he ranked eighth in the FBS with 111.3 receiving yards per game (58-1,002-17.3, nine TDs; 11-100-9.1 punt returns in nine starts). Doubs was a first-team All-MWC selection in 2021, as well, after leading the Wolf Pack with 80 receptions, 1,109 receiving yards (13.9 per catch) and 11 touchdowns while effectively returning punts (12-170-14.2). He opted out of the team’s bowl game to prepare for the NFL draft.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Will check the boxes for height, weight and speed, but tightness in his lower half limits the upside. Doubs has been a productive, high-volume target with speed to separate deep but he’s a linear route-runner who will struggle to elude NFL press and separate from tight man coverage over the first two levels. His toughness, ball skills and special teams potential increase his chances of earning a backup role.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 0”     Wt: 196 lbs
Arms: 29”   Hands: 9 1/2”
School: Boise State
Prospect Grade: 6.18 
Next Gen Score: 79

Production (2021): 77 rec | 1,117 yds | 7 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.43 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:   34.5
Broad Jump:       124
3 Cone Drill:       7.28
20 Yd Shuttle:    4.21
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

In 2019, Shakir looked like the four-star prospect that recruiting services labeled him coming out of Vista Murrieta High School in California. He was an honorable mention All-Mountain West Conference selection as a sophomore, leading the Broncos with 63 receptions that covered 872 yards (13.8 per rec.) and scoring six times on the year. Shakir was a first-team all-conference selection as a junior team captain, ranking 13th in the FBS with 7.4 receptions per game in seven starts (52-719-13.8, six TDs). He contributed in one of 10 games played as a true freshman (16-170-10.6, one TD) before a knee sprain ended his season prematurely. Shakir was limited in spring 2021 practices after having surgery on a lower body injury, but that did not affect his play in the fall, as he led the Broncos with 77 receptions, 1,117 receiving yards (14.5 per catch) and seven scores in 12 games (11 starts) to once again land first-team all-league honors. He also rushed for 130 yards on 21 carries (6.2 per att.) and returned kickoffs (3-80-26.7) and punts (9-115-12.8).

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

A coach’s dream, combining competitive nature, exciting versatility and elite character on and off the field. For a short-armed player with average explosiveness, Shakir puts an emphatic stamp on games. He’s more football player than prototypical slot receiver and needs to prove he can handle an increase in contested catches. He can be activated from a variety of alignments with the vision, wiggle and toughness to move the chains once the ball is in his hands. He finds a way to frequently show up on the notepad when watching tape and his will to outperform the guy across from him should not be overlooked. Shakir should become a valuable piece for a creative play-caller.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 0”             Wt: 204 lbs
Arms: 30 7/8”   Hands: 9 3/4”
School: Tennessee
Prospect Grade: 5.93 
Next Gen Score: 72

Production (2021): 62 rec | 807 yds | 7 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.31 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:     33
Broad Jump:       121
3 Cone Drill:         
20 Yd Shuttle:      
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

Velus (pronounced VAY-lus) transferred from USC to Tennessee for the 2020 season and started six of 10 games played for the Volunteers (22-280-12.7, three TDs receiving; 3-16-5.3 rushing; 18-398-22.1 kickoff returns). His receiving production greatly increased in 2021 (62-807-13.0, seven TDs) in addition to sharing SEC Special Teams Player of the Year honors with Alabama receiver Jameson Williams as a return specialist (23-628-27.3, one TD kick returns; 18-272-15.1 punt returns). Jones had moved across the country when signing with the Trojans, arriving in Los Angeles after earning first-team all-state honors at Saraland High School in Alabama. As a redshirt freshman, he played in all 14 games as a reserve wideout (6-46-7.7 receiving; 5-15-3.0 rushing) and top kick returner (31-760-24.5). Jones received more work on offense as a sophomore (24-266-11.1, one TD receiving; 6-13-2.2, one TD rushing, four starts in 12 games) while still returning kicks (21-483-23.0). His work as a receiver dropped off in 2019 (6-35-5.8 receiving) but Pac-12 coaches noted his special team contributions by voting him second-team all-conference as a kick returner (29-704-24.3, one TD).

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Special-teams specialist with good size. Despite spending six seasons in college between his time at USC and Tennessee, Jones has very modest production as a wideout, but flashed potential in that area in 2021. He’s fearless with the ball in his hands after the catch and as a kick returner. He’s not a very fundamentally sound route-runner but might not need to be if teams view him as a catch-and-run specialist in the quick game underneath. Jones has a chance to ride his special teams versatility into a specialist spot on a roster.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

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Ht: 5′ 8”              Wt: 178 lbs
Arms: 27 5/8”    Hands: 9”
School: Kentucky
Prospect Grade: 6.17 
Next Gen Score: 80

Production (2021): 104 rec | 1,334 yds | 7 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:    4.44 
Bench Press:         
Vertical Jump:   34.5
Broad Jump:       118
3 Cone Drill:         
20 Yd Shuttle:      
60 Yd Shuttle:      

Player Bio

“Dale” transferred from Nebraska to Kentucky for the 2021 season to be closer to his hometown of Frankfort -– his grandmother’s post-COVID complications were one factor. The move proved wise for football reasons because he excelled at a second-team All-SEC level by ranking third in the country with a school-record 104 receptions that covered 1,334 yards, also a Kentucky record. He scored seven times through the air while rushing for 111 yards (seven carries, 15.9 per att.) and returning punts (6-20-3.3) in 13 games with 12 starts. Robinson was named the 2022 Citrus Bowl MVP (10-170-17.0 receiving), which the Wildcats won over Iowa. He was a four-star recruit and Mr. Football in the state of Kentucky as a senior at Western Hills High School (6,795 career rushing yards, averaged 11 yards per carry). Robinson was an honorable mention All-Big Ten Conference pick and Freshman All-American for the Huskers in 2019, starting four of 10 games played (40-453-11.3, two TDs receiving; 88-340-3.9, three TDs rushing; 11-236-21.5 kick returns; three starts at receiver, one at running back). He had won the Paul Hornung Award as Kentucky’s top high school football player in 2018 and was a finalist for the Paul Hornung Award as college football’s most versatile player the following fall. Robinson was an honorable mention all-conference pick in 2020, as well, leading Nebraska with 51 receptions for 461 receiving yards (9.0 per, one TD) while starting six games outside and two at running back (46-240-5.2, one TD rushing). His father, Dale, played football at Western Kentucky.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Robinson will be tabbed as a slot receiver but that is underselling his potential. He’s sudden and slick with an ability to make plays from a variety of alignments. He has gadget potential and can function as a dump-and-run target, acting as an extension of the running game. A lack of length and play strength could be a concern until he tightens up the route-running to prevent contested catches. He’s much lighter than Deebo Samuel, but the competitiveness, acceleration and run-after-catch talent could have teams eyeing a somewhat similar usage for Robinson in the future.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Ht: 6′ 1”              Wt: 215 lbs
Arms: 31 1/2”    Hands: 9 1/4”
School: Mississippi
Prospect Grade: 5.90 
Next Gen Score: 70

Production (2021): 76 rec | 1,028 yds | 8 td

Combine Results

40 Yard Dash:   4.65 
Bench Press:        
Vertical Jump:    34
Broad Jump:      122
3 Cone Drill:        
20 Yd Shuttle:    
60 Yd Shuttle:     

Player Bio

“Drumm” was a first-team NJCAA All-American in 2018 (58-857-14.8, 11 TDs) and helped East Mississippi Community College win two national titles (he had 10 TD receptions in 2017) while he was there. The second-team All-Mississippi selection as a senior at Laurel High School decided to stay in-state when moving to the FBS, playing in all 12 games with nine starts for the Rebels in 2019 (13-188-14.5). Drummond started nine of 10 games in 2020, catching 25 passes for 417 yards (16.7 per rec.) and seven scores. He formed a strong rapport with star quarterback Matt Corral in 2021, leading the Rebels with 76 receptions, 1,028 receiving yards (13.5 per catch) and eight touchdowns in 12 starts. Drummond also returned nine punts for 84 yards (9.3 per return) during his career.

— Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Player Analysis

Drummond’s play speed can be inconsistent, so his timed speed could be an indicator of which direction his draft stock might head. He’s a smooth athlete with the ability to run a more robust route tree with additional schooling but the hands and ball skills are a little disappointing and might not improve much. Drummond’s run-after-catch talent is where he shines and where he brings instant value for a team. He has an intriguing ceiling but a lower floor as a Day 3 target.

— Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

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