21 Wall Prints Every San Francisco Lover Needs On Their Wall

San Francisco Wall Art Prints

We picked some of San Francisco’s most iconic views and made them available in spectacular aluminum prints.

Aluminum prints are a relatively new medium so they are not something you’ll see in every home. They are ideal for those who are really looking to bring the “wow factor” to their space — so don’t be afraid to think outside the box and test out unique designs.

Colors printed on aluminum are highly saturated, even in large monochrome areas, so these prints are ideal for experimenting with bright colors. The lightweight material makes it the perfect choice for larger prints well-suited for your larger wall spaces.

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By Jimmy Nguyen

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 8 x 5

$59 — $304

San Francisco is known for its cool summers, fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of architecture, and landmarks, including the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars, the former Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary, Fisherman’s Wharf, and its Chinatown district.

By Vincent Ledvina

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 49 x 86

$59 — $304

Designed by Joseph Strauss in 1917, the Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the one-mile-wide strait connecting San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. The structure connects the San Francisco Peninsula—to Marin County, carrying both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1 across the strait. It also carries U.S. Bicycle Route 95.

At the time of its opening in 1937, it was both the longest (main span of 4,200 feet) and the tallest (total height of 746 feet) suspension bridge in the world.

Declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World, the bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco and California.

 

By Billy Huynh

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 51 x 34

$59 — $198

Muir Woods National Monument is a U.S. National Monument named after naturalist John Muir. It is located on Mount Tamalpais near the Pacific coast, in southwestern Marin County, California — 12 miles north of San Francisco. It protects 554 acres, including 240 acres of old growth coast redwood forests.

By Ragnar Vorel

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 80 x 53

$59 — $304

Fort Point is a masonry seacoast fortification located on the southern side of the Golden Gate at the entrance to San Francisco Bay. 

The fort was completed just before the American Civil War by the United States Army, to defend San Francisco Bay against hostile warships. 

By Denys Nevozhai

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 49 x 86

$49 — $278

Upon its completion in 2018, the Salesforce Tower became the tallest skyscraper in the San Francisco skyline, with a top roof height of 970 feet and overall height of 1,070 feet, surpassing the 853 feet Transamerica Pyramid.

It is the second-tallest building west of the Mississippi River after the 1,100 feet Wilshire Grand Center in Los Angeles. If decorative spires are excluded, the Salesforce Tower is taller than the Wilshire Grand, and with a taller roofline than Los Angeles’ U.S. Bank Tower, the Salesforce tower is tallest according to roofline.

By Alina K.

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 40 x 60

$59 — $274

The San Francisco cable car system is the world’s last manually operated cable car system. Of the 23 lines established between 1873 and 1890, only three remain (one of which combines parts of two earlier lines): two routes from downtown near Union Square to Fisherman’s Wharf, and a third route along California Street.

The cable cars are separate from San Francisco’s heritage streetcars, which operate on Market Street and the Embarcadero, as well as from the more modern Muni Metro light rail system.

By Jeremiah Higgins

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 60 x 40

$59 — $274

Mount Diablo is a mountain in Contra Costa County, in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area. It is an isolated upthrust peak of 3,849 feet, visible from most of the San Francisco Bay Area. Mount Diablo appears from many angles to be a double pyramid and has many subsidiary peaks. The largest and closest is North Peak, the other half of the double pyramid, which is nearly as high in elevation at 3,557 feet, and is about one mile northeast of the main summit.

By Joshua Sortino

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 75 x 50

$59 — $304

In American architecture, painted ladies are Victorian and Edwardian houses and buildings repainted, starting in the 1960s, in three or more colors that embellish or enhance their architectural details. 

Since then, the term has also been used to describe groups of colorfully repainted Victorian houses in other American cities, such as the Charles Village neighborhood in Baltimore; Lafayette Square in St. Louis; the greater San Francisco and New Orleans areas, in general; Columbia-Tusculum in Cincinnati; the Old West End in Toledo, Ohio; the neighborhoods of McKnight and Forest Park in Springfield, Massachusetts; and the city of Cape May, New Jersey.

By Alec Krum

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 40 x 60

$59 — $274

Pier 39 is a shopping center and popular tourist attraction with shops, restaurants, a video arcade, street performances, the Aquarium of the Bay, virtual 3D rides, and views of California sea lions hauled out on docks on Pier 39’s marina. A two-story carousel is one of the pier’s more dominant features, although it is not directly visible from the street and sits towards the end of the pier.

The pier is located at the edge of the Fisherman’s Wharf district and is close to North Beach, Chinatown, and the Embarcadero. The area is easily accessible with the historic F Market streetcars.

From the pier one can see Angel Island, Alcatraz Island, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the Bay Bridge.

By Elie Khoury

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 42 x 57

$59 — $274

Marshall’s Beach is a secluded beach located just north of Baker Beach, and is one of the best beaches near the Golden Gate Bridge. It’s incredibly photogenic, offering spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean and the Marin Headlands.

Just minutes from the City, this is a great beach to take a break from hiking, do a little birdwatching, and explore the Serpentine rock formations and native wildflowers.

This is one of the best places to take in a sunset over the Pacific Ocean. Just don’t forget to bring extra layers – you’re at the edge of the continent…and it can get cold out there!

By Matthias Mullie

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 39 x 24

$59 — $126

Buena Vista Park is the oldest official park in San Francisco, established in 1867 as Hill Park, and later be renamed Buena Vista. It’s located in the Haight-Ashbury and Buena Vista Heights neighborhoods of San Francisco. The park is on a steep hill that peaks at 575 feet, and covers 37 acres. The lowest section is the north end along Haight.

By Fran V.

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 34 x 51

$59 — $198

Mission Dolores Park, often abbreviated to Dolores Park, is a city park in San Francisco. It is located two blocks south of Mission Dolores at the western edge of the Mission District.

The park’s topography is characterized by a strong slope from the southwest down to the northeast, offering an unobstructed northeast-looking view of downtown San Francisco, in particular from the southwest corner.

The southern half of the park is also notable for its views of the Mission district, downtown, the San Francisco Bay and the East Bay. The Muni Metro J-Church streetcar line runs through the park along its western border.

The park lies east of Twin Peaks in the warm and sunny microclimate of the Mission neighborhood, which was named one of the coolest neighborhoods in the world in 2016, and as of 2016 it was attracting up to 7,000–10,000 people on a sunny weekend day.

By Miguel Dominguez

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 40 x 60

$59 — $274

The Palace of Fine Arts is a monumental structure originally constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in order to exhibit works of art. Completely rebuilt from 1964 to 1974, it is the only structure from the Exposition that survives on site.

The most prominent building of the complex, a 162 feet high open rotunda, is enclosed by a lagoon on one side, and is neighboring a large, curved exhibition center on the other side, which is separated from the lagoon by colonnades.

Conceived to evoke a decaying ruin of ancient Rome, the Palace of Fine Arts became one of San Francisco’s most recognizable landmarks.

By Derick Daily

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 38 x 58

$59 — $274

The San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge, known locally as the Bay Bridge, is a complex of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay in California. As part of Interstate 80 and the direct road between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries about 260,000 vehicles a day and has one of the longest spans in the United States.

Construction began in 1933 by the American Bridge Company, it opened November 12, 1936, six months before the Golden Gate Bridge.

The bridge has two sections of roughly equal length; the older western section, officially known as the Willie L. Brown Jr. Bridge, connects downtown San Francisco to Yerba Buena Island, and the newer unnamed eastern section connects the island to Oakland.

The western section is a double suspension bridge with two decks, westbound traffic being carried on the upper deck while eastbound is carried on the lower one.

The largest span of the original eastern section was a cantilever bridge. During the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, a portion of the eastern section’s upper deck collapsed onto the lower deck and the bridge was closed for a month. Reconstruction of the eastern section of the bridge as a causeway connected to a self-anchored suspension bridge began in 2002; the new eastern section opened September 2, 2013, at a reported cost of over $6.5 billion. Unlike the western section and the original eastern section of the bridge, the new eastern section is a single deck carrying all eastbound and westbound lanes, making it the world’s widest bridge, according to Guinness World Records, as of 2014.

By Kyle Glenn

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 58 x 38

$59 — $274

The Dutch Windmill is the northern of two functioning windmills, the other being Murphy Windmill, on the western edge of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, California. It was completed in 1903, and placed on the San Francisco Designated Landmark list on December 6, 1981.

By Casey Horner

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 38 x 56

$59 — $274

The Lincoln Park Steps in San Francisco is a gorgeous staircase with colorfully tiled stairs. They feature lovely designs with colors of blue, yellow, orange and green tiles.

The original concrete stairs date back to the early 1900s. Over the years, they fell into some disrepair and needed a face-lift.

In 2007, the organization Friends of Lincoln Park wanted to make a change so they could update and beautify the stairs.

You will find the stairs where California Street dead ends, just after 32nd Street. At the top of the stairs is Lincoln Park which features a golf course, the Legion of Honor, and parts of the Land’s End trail.

By Rezaul Karim

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 34 x 51

$59 — $198

California Street is a major thoroughfare in San Francisco, California. It is one of the longest streets in San Francisco, and includes a number of important landmarks. It runs in an approximately straight 5.2 mi east-west line from the Financial District to Lincoln Park in the far Northwest corner of the City.

By Fran M.

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 40 x 60

$59 — $274

The Twin Peaks are two prominent hills with an elevation of about 925 feet located near the geographic center of San Francisco, California. Within the city only 928 foot Mount Davidson is higher.

The North and South Twin Peaks, also known as “Eureka” and “Noe” respectively, are about 660 ft apart. The peaks form a divide for the summer coastal fog that pushes in from the Pacific Ocean. Their west-facing slopes often get fog and strong winds, while the east-facing slopes receive more sun and warmth. Elevation at each summit is just over 900 feet. On some rare occasions, Twin Peaks has been able to get a dusting of snow.

By Alex Bierwagen

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 37 x 46

$59 — $198

The Great Highway is a road in San Francisco that forms the city’s western edge along the Pacific coast. Built in 1929, it runs for approximately 3.5 miles next to Ocean Beach. Its southern end is at Skyline Boulevard (State Route 35) near Lake Merced; it extends to Point Lobos Avenue and the Cliff House at its northern end.

By Edgar Chaparro

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 77 x 51

$59 — $304

The Chinatown centered on Grant Avenue and Stockton Street in San Francisco, California, is the oldest Chinatown in North America and the largest Chinese enclave outside Asia.

By Jesse Collins

Available Mediums: Aluminum

Original Ratio: 59 x 39

$59 — $274

Coit Tower is a 210-foot tower in Telegraph Hill that offers panoramic views over the city and the bay. At Lillie Hitchcock Coit’s bequest to beautify the city the tower was built between 1932 and 1933.

Also known as the Coit Memorial Tower, it was dedicated to the volunteer firemen who had died in San Francisco’s five major fires.

Founded on June 29, 1776, by colonists from Spain, San Francisco was named after Francis of Assisi, covers more than 46 square miles and is the 17th most populous city in the United States; the fourth most populous in California. It is the second most densely populated large U.S. city and the 12th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States with 4.7 million residents; providing the fourth-largest economic output, with a GDP of $592 billion in 2019.

The California Gold Rush of 1849 brought rapid growth, making it the largest city on the West Coast at the time.

After the 1906 earthquake and fire, San Francisco was quickly rebuilt, hosting the Panama-Pacific International Exposition nine years later.

In World War II, San Francisco was a major port of embarkation, and it then became the birthplace of the United Nations in 1945.

After the war, the confluence of returning servicemen, significant immigration, liberalizing attitudes, along with the rise of the “beatnik” and “hippie” countercultures, the Sexual Revolution, the Peace Movement growing from opposition to United States involvement in the Vietnam War, and other factors led to the Summer of Love and the gay rights movement.

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