fbpx

When you purchase products or services through our links we and our partners earn a small commission. Thank you.

The Masters: History and Course Review of Augusta National Golf Club

Charles Schwab | https://www.schwab.com/
Table of Contents
The Holy Week of Golf is here. In this article we'll dive into the history of the golf club, provide an overview of the course, and explore best bets for DFS.

History of Augusta National Golf Course

Augusta National Golf Club is a prestigious golf club located in Augusta, Georgia. Founded in 1932 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts, the club has become one of the most famous and exclusive golf clubs in the world.

Bobby Jones, a legendary golfer who had retired from competitive golf, was looking for a place to build his dream golf course. With the help of Clifford Roberts, an investment banker, he purchased a 365-acre property in Augusta, Georgia, which had previously been a nursery.

The two men hired Alister MacKenzie, a renowned golf course architect, to design the course. The course was built in just over a year and opened for play in January 1933.

The first tournament held at Augusta National Golf Club was the Augusta National Invitation Tournament, which was later renamed the Masters Tournament. The inaugural tournament was held in March 1934 and was won by Horton Smith.

The Masters Tournament quickly became one of the most prestigious and important tournaments in golf. The tournament is held annually in April and is one of the four major championships in men’s professional golf.

Augusta National Golf Club has undergone several changes and improvements over the years. In the early years, the course was lengthened and the greens were enlarged. In the 1950s, the famous Eisenhower Tree was planted on the 17th hole.

In the 1980s, the course was redesigned by Jack Nicklaus, who added length and difficulty to several holes. In 2002, the course underwent another major renovation, which included the lengthening of several holes and the installation of a new irrigation system.

Augusta National Golf Club has also been known for its exclusivity and membership policies. The club did not admit its first African American member until 1990 and its first female member until 2012.

Despite the controversies surrounding its membership policies, Augusta National Golf Club remains one of the most revered and iconic golf courses in the world. The club has hosted some of the greatest moments in golf history, including Jack Nicklaus’ historic comeback win in 1986 and Tiger Woods’ dominant win in 1997.

Today, Augusta National Golf Club continues to host the Masters Tournament and remains a symbol of excellence and tradition in the world of golf.

History of The Masters

The Masters Tournament is one of the most prestigious golf events in the world. Held annually at the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, USA, the Masters is the first of the four major professional golf tournaments played each year. The Masters has a rich and fascinating history, dating back to its inception in 1934. In this article, we will take a closer look at the history of the Masters and the Augusta National Golf Club.

Augusta National Golf Club

The Augusta National Golf Club was founded by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts in 1931. The idea for the club originated when Jones retired from competitive golf at the age of 28. He wanted to create a golf course that would challenge the world’s best golfers and also be a beautiful and enjoyable place to play. The Augusta National Golf Club was built on the site of an old indigo plantation in Augusta, Georgia.

The club’s first tournament was the Augusta National Invitation Tournament, which was held in March 1934. This tournament later became known as the Masters Tournament. The course was designed by Jones and Alister MacKenzie, a renowned golf course architect. The course is known for its beauty, with its rolling hills, wide fairways, and tall pine trees.

The First Masters

The first Masters Tournament was held in 1934, and it was won by Horton Smith. The tournament had a prize purse of $5,000, with $1,500 going to the winner. The field consisted of 72 players, including many of the top golfers of the day, such as Gene Sarazen, Walter Hagen, and Sam Snead.

The Masters quickly became one of the most prestigious golf tournaments in the world. Its popularity grew during the 1950s and 1960s, thanks in part to the emergence of television. The tournament was broadcast on television for the first time in 1956.

Famous Masters Moments

Over the years, the Masters has produced many memorable moments. One of the most famous moments in Masters history occurred in 1935 when Gene Sarazen hit “the shot heard ’round the world.” On the par-5 15th hole, Sarazen hit a 4-wood from 235 yards that landed on the green and rolled into the hole for an albatross (three under par). This shot helped Sarazen force a playoff with Craig Wood, which he went on to win.

Another famous Masters moment occurred in 1986 when Jack Nicklaus won his sixth green jacket at the age of 46. Nicklaus’ final round of 65 included an eagle on the 15th hole and birdies on the 16th and 17th holes. This victory made Nicklaus the oldest player to win the Masters and cemented his status as one of the greatest golfers of all time.

Recent Years

In recent years, the Masters has continued to be one of the most popular and prestigious golf tournaments in the world. The tournament has also made efforts to modernize and evolve, with changes to the course and improvements in technology.

In 2019, Tiger Woods won his fifth Masters, 14 years after his last win at Augusta. Woods’ victory was seen as one of the greatest comebacks in sports history, as he had battled injuries and personal issues in the years leading up to his win.

Conclusion

The Masters Tournament and Augusta National Golf Club have a rich history, full of memorable moments and legendary players. From its beginnings in 1934 to the present day, the Masters has continued to be one of the most prestigious golf tournaments in the world. With its beautiful course, top-notch facilities, and incredible atmosphere, the Masters is truly a one-of-a-kind event that every golf fan should experience at least once.

Course Preview (Hole-by-Hole)

Hole 1 - "Tea Olive"

The 1st hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Tea Olive” and is a par 4 that measures 445 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must hit a precise drive to avoid bunkers on both the left and right sides of the fairway. The fairway then slopes downward toward the green, adding distance to players’ tee shots and making the approach shot challenging.

The green on the 1st hole is guarded by bunkers on the left and right sides and slopes from back to front, making it important for players to land their approach shots in the correct portion of the green. The green is also one of the smaller ones on the course, adding to the difficulty of the hole.

The 1st hole is known for its signature feature, the Tea Olive tree, which stands to the left of the fairway near the tee box. This tree is over 100 years old and is one of the most iconic landmarks on the course.

Overall, the 1st hole at Augusta National Golf Club is a challenging and beautiful par 4 that sets the tone for the rest of the course. Its unique features and stunning scenery make it a favorite among players and fans alike and add to the overall beauty and charm of the Augusta National Golf Club.

Hole 2 - "Pink Dogwood"

The 2nd hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Pink Dogwood” and is a par 5 that measures 575 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must hit a precise drive to avoid a bunker on the left and trees on the right. The fairway then narrows and turns sharply to the left, making the second shot challenging for players.

The green on the 2nd hole is guarded by two bunkers on the front left and right sides, and a bunker on the back left. The green slopes from back to front and is surrounded by beautiful pink dogwood trees, which are in bloom during the Masters tournament in April.

The 2nd hole is considered one of the more strategic holes on the course, as players must decide whether to lay up or attempt to reach the green in two shots. A well-executed second shot can set up a birdie opportunity, while a poorly executed shot can result in a bogey or worse.

Overall, the 2nd hole at Augusta National Golf Club is a challenging yet beautiful par 5 that requires precision and strategy to navigate successfully. Its stunning scenery and unique features make it a favorite among players and fans alike and add to the overall beauty and charm of the Augusta National Golf Club.

Hole 3 - "Flowering Peach"

The 3rd hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Flowering Peach” and is a par 4 that measures 350 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a narrow and bending fairway that is guarded by trees on both sides. A bunker on the left side of the fairway also comes into play, adding an additional challenge for players.

The second shot on “Flowering Peach” is equally challenging, as the green is well-guarded by bunkers on both sides. The green slopes from back to front and is surrounded by azaleas and other beautiful flowering plants.

One of the unique features of the 3rd hole is the huge tree that sits just to the right of the green. This tree, known as “Ike’s Tree,” was named after former President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who requested that it not be removed during a renovation of the course in the 1950s.

Overall, the 3rd hole is a strategic and challenging par 4 that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. Its stunning scenery and unique features make it a favorite among players and fans alike and add to the overall beauty and charm of the Augusta National Golf Club.

Hole 4 - "Flowering Crab Apple"

The 4th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Flowering Crab Apple” and is a par 3 that measures 240 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a long, narrow, and uphill fairway that is guarded by bunkers on both sides. The green is elevated and slopes from back to front, making putting a challenge.

The hole gets its name from the beautiful crab apple trees that surround the green and bloom with pink and white flowers in the spring. These trees add to the beauty and charm of the hole and are a favorite among players and fans alike.

Due to its length and elevation change, the 4th hole is considered one of the toughest par 3 holes in the world. Players must hit a precise and powerful shot to reach the green and avoid the bunkers that surround it.

Overall, the 4th hole at Augusta National is a challenging and beautiful par 3 that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s abilities and adds to the overall challenge and excitement of the Masters tournament.

Hole 5 - "Magnolia"

The 5th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Magnolia” and is a par 4 that measures 495 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a narrow fairway that is guarded by trees on both sides. A bunker on the right side of the fairway also comes into play, adding an additional challenge for players.

The second shot on “Magnolia” is equally challenging, as the green is well-guarded by bunkers on the left and right sides. The green slopes from back to front and features multiple undulations, making putting a challenge.

One of the most unique features of the 5th hole is the large magnolia tree that sits just to the right of the green. This tree is over 150 years old and adds to the beauty and charm of the hole.

Overall, the 5th hole is a challenging and strategic par 4 that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s shot-making abilities and has been the site of many memorable moments in Masters history.

Hole 6 - "Juniper"

The 6th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Juniper” and is a par 3 that measures 180 yards from the championship tees.

The hole features a large green that slopes from back to front and is guarded by a bunker on the left side. A pond also comes into play, as it sits in front of the green and requires players to hit a precise shot to avoid getting wet.

The tee shot on “Juniper” is particularly challenging due to the wind that often swirls through the trees, making club selection and shot placement critical. A miss to the right will likely result in a difficult chip shot, while a miss to the left could find the bunker and make getting up and down for par a challenge.

One of the unique features of the 6th hole is the green’s shape, which is modeled after the continent of Australia. The back of the green represents the western coastline, while the front of the green represents the eastern coastline. This feature adds to the course’s charm and makes the hole even more memorable.

Overall, the 6th hole at Augusta National is a challenging par 3 that requires precision and strategy to navigate successfully. It is a fan-favorite, and its beauty and difficulty have contributed to its reputation as one of the best par 3 holes in the world.

Hole 7 - "Pampas"

The 7th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Pampas” and is a par 4 that measures 450 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must hit a long and accurate drive to avoid the fairway bunker on the right side of the fairway. The ideal landing area is on the left side of the fairway, which provides a better angle for the approach shot.

The second shot on “Pampas” is uphill and requires a precise shot to a green that is guarded by three bunkers on the left side. The green slopes from back to front and features multiple undulations, making putting a challenge.

One of the most unique aspects of the 7th hole is the placement of the green, which is perched on a hilltop and provides panoramic views of the surrounding course. This feature, along with the difficulty of the hole, has made the 7th one of the most iconic and memorable holes at Augusta National.

Overall, “Pampas” is a challenging and strategic hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s shot-making abilities, and it has been the site of many memorable moments in Masters history.

Hole 8 - "Yellow Jasmine"

The 8th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Yellow Jasmine” and is a challenging par 5 that measures 570 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must hit a long and accurate drive that avoids the fairway bunker on the left side of the fairway. The ideal tee shot is a slight fade that sets up a better angle for the second shot.

The second shot on “Yellow Jasmine” is a critical one, as players must decide whether to lay up or attempt to reach the green in two shots. The green is protected by a large pond on the front left and a bunker on the right, making the decision a difficult one.

The green itself is relatively flat, but its undulations can make putting a challenge, especially when the hole is cut in a difficult location. The green also features a false front, making it important for players to hit the ball past the hole to avoid rolling back down the slope.

One of the most unique aspects of the 8th hole is that it features a tree in the middle of the fairway, known as the “Eisenhower Tree”, which was named after former US President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The tree was removed in 2014 after being damaged in an ice storm, but its presence made the second shot even more challenging.

Overall, “Yellow Jasmine” is a challenging and strategic hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s decision-making abilities and shot-making skills, and it has been the site of many memorable moments in Masters history.

Hole 9 - "Carolina Cherry"

The 9th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Carolina Cherry” and is a challenging and scenic par 4 that measures 460 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a narrow and twisting fairway that is guarded by tall trees on both sides. The ideal tee shot is a slight draw that avoids the fairway bunker on the left and sets up a better angle for the approach shot.

The second shot on “Carolina Cherry” is one of the most challenging shots on the course, as players must hit a long and accurate shot to a green that is protected by a deep bunker on the left and a large slope on the right. The green itself is relatively flat, but its undulations can make putting a challenge, especially when the hole is cut in a difficult location.

One of the most unique aspects of the 9th hole is that it is the last hole of the front nine at Augusta National during the Masters Tournament. In addition, the hole has been the site of many memorable moments in Masters history, including Gary Player’s incredible birdie on the final day of the 1978 tournament that helped him win his third green jacket.

Overall, “Carolina Cherry” is a challenging and scenic hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s shot-making abilities and is one of the most iconic holes in all of golf.

Hole 10 - "Camellia"

The 10th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Camellia” and is a challenging and unique par 4 that measures 495 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must hit a straight and accurate shot that avoids the large fairway bunker on the right side of the fairway. The ideal tee shot is a slight draw that hugs the left side of the fairway, which sets up a better angle for the approach shot.

The second shot on “Camellia” is one of the most challenging shots on the course, as players must hit a long and accurate shot to a green that is protected by a large bunker on the front left and a deep slope on the right. The green itself is relatively flat, but its undulations can make putting a challenge, especially when the hole is cut in a difficult location.

One of the most unique aspects of the 10th hole is that it serves as the starting hole for the back nine at Augusta National during the Masters Tournament. In addition, the hole has been the site of many memorable moments in Masters history, including Bubba Watson’s incredible hook shot from the trees during the final round of the 2012 tournament that helped him win his first green jacket.

Overall, “Camellia” is a challenging and unique hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s shot-making abilities and is one of the most iconic holes in all of golf.

Hole 11 - "White Dogwood"

The 11th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “White Dogwood” and is a challenging and picturesque par 4 that measures 505 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a narrow and twisting fairway that is guarded by tall trees on both sides. The ideal tee shot is a slight draw that hugs the left side of the fairway, which sets up a better angle for the approach shot.

The second shot on “White Dogwood” is one of the most challenging shots on the course, as players must hit a long and accurate shot to a green that is protected by two large bunkers in front and a deep slope in the back. The green itself is relatively flat, but its undulations can make putting a challenge, especially when the hole is cut in a difficult location.

The 11th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Larry Mize’s incredible chip-in to win the 1987 tournament in a playoff against Greg Norman.

Overall, “White Dogwood” is a beautiful and challenging hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s shot-making abilities and is one of the most iconic holes in all of golf.

Hole 12 - "Golden Bell"

The 12th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Golden Bell” and is a picturesque but treacherous par 3 that measures 155 yards from the championship tees.

The hole is named after the Golden Bell, a flower-shaped shrub that sits behind the green and provides a beautiful backdrop for this iconic hole. However, despite its beauty, the 12th hole is one of the most challenging holes on the course, especially when the wind is swirling.

The tee shot on “Golden Bell” requires pinpoint accuracy, as players must hit a short iron or wedge to a green that is surrounded by three bunkers and a creek that runs in front of the green. The green itself is relatively small and slopes from back to front, which can make putting a challenge.

The 12th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Jordan Spieth’s quadruple-bogey during the final round of the 2016 tournament that cost him a chance at winning his second green jacket.

Overall, “Golden Bell” is a beautiful but challenging hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a true test of a player’s nerves and shot-making abilities and is one of the most iconic holes in all of golf.

Hole 13 - "Azalea"

The 13th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Azalea” and is a beautiful and challenging par 5 that measures 510 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a fairway that slopes from right to left and has a series of trees and bunkers on the left side. The ideal tee shot is a slight draw that hugs the left side of the fairway, which sets up a better angle for the second shot.

The second shot on “Azalea” is critical, as players must decide whether to lay up short of the creek that crosses the fairway or attempt to hit a long and accurate shot over the water to reach the green in two. The green itself is large and undulating, with multiple tiers and subtle breaks that can make putting a challenge.

The 13th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Phil Mickelson’s daring second shot over the creek during the final round of the 2010 tournament that helped him secure his third green jacket.

Overall, “Azalea” is a beautiful and challenging hole that requires players to bring their best game to succeed. It is a favorite among players and fans alike and is an iconic part of the Augusta National Golf Club experience.

Hole 14 - "Chinese Fir"

The 14th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Chinese Fir” and is a challenging par 4 that measures 440 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a fairway that is sloped from left to right and has a series of bunkers on the right side. The ideal approach angle to the green is from the left side of the fairway, which can make it a challenging tee shot for right-handed players who prefer to fade the ball.

The second shot on “Chinese Fir” is equally demanding, as players must hit a mid to long iron to reach the green, which is guarded by two bunkers on the right side. The green itself is relatively shallow and slopes from back to front, making it important for players to hit the right distance with their approach shot to avoid rolling off the front of the green.

The 14th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Phil Mickelson’s famous shot from the pine straw behind the green during the final round of the 2010 tournament that helped him secure his third green jacket.

Overall, “Chinese Fir” is a challenging and strategic hole that requires players to navigate both the tee shot and approach shot with precision and skill. It is a fitting prelude to the demanding closing stretch of holes at Augusta National Golf Club.

Hole 15 - "Firethorn"

The 15th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Firethorn” and is a challenging par 5 that measures 530 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a narrow chute of trees that frames the fairway and sets up a demanding second shot. The fairway slopes from right to left, which can make it difficult for shots that miss to the left to stay in play.

The second shot on “Firethorn” is crucial, as players must hit a long and accurate shot over a pond that guards the front of the green. The green itself is large and undulating, with multiple tiers and subtle breaks that can make putting a challenge.

The 15th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Gene Sarazen’s famous double eagle in 1935 that helped him secure the first of his three green jackets.

Overall, “Firethorn” is a beautiful and challenging hole that requires players to bring their best game to succeed. It is one of the longer par 5s on the course and requires both length and accuracy to navigate successfully.

Hole 16 - "Redbud"

The 16th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Redbud” and is one of the most famous and picturesque holes in all of golf. It is a par 3 that measures 170 yards from the championship tees.

The tee shot on “Redbud” requires precision and accuracy, as players must hit over a pond that guards the front of the green. The green itself is relatively shallow and slopes from back to front, making it important for players to hit the right distance with their tee shot to leave themselves with a good birdie opportunity.

The 16th hole at Augusta National is known for its iconic setting, with the beautiful blooming redbud trees that surround the green providing a stunning backdrop for players and spectators alike. The hole is also famous for its potential for drama, as the steep slope on the left side of the green can cause balls to roll back into the water if players are not careful with their shots.

The 16th hole has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Tiger Woods’ famous chip-in during the final round of the 2005 tournament that helped him secure his fourth green jacket.

Overall, “Redbud” is a beautiful and challenging hole that requires precision and skill to navigate successfully. It is a favorite among players and fans alike and is an iconic part of the Augusta National Golf Club experience.

Hole 17 - Nandina

The 17th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is called “Nandina” and is a beautiful but challenging par 4 that measures 440 yards from the championship tees.

Off the tee, players must navigate a fairway that is sloped from right to left and has a series of bunkers on the left side. Shots that miss to the right can also leave players with a challenging approach shot over a greenside bunker.

The second shot is equally demanding, as players must hit a mid to long iron to reach the green, which is guarded by a bunker on the left side and a large slope on the right. The green itself is one of the most undulating on the course, with multiple tiers and subtle breaks that make putting a challenge.

The 17th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including Jack Nicklaus’ famous chip-in in 1975 that helped him secure his fifth green jacket.

Overall, “Nandina” is a challenging and picturesque hole that requires players to bring their best game to succeed. It is a fitting prelude to the famous 18th hole at Augusta National Golf Club.

Hole 18 - Holly

The 18th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is one of the most iconic finishing holes in golf. The hole is a par 4 that measures 465 yards from the championship tees and requires precision and strategy from golfers.

Off the tee, players must hit a drive that avoids the fairway bunkers on the left side and sets up an approach shot that avoids the large oak tree that guards the right side of the fairway.

The second shot is equally challenging, with a long iron or fairway wood required to reach the elevated green. The green is protected by two bunkers on the front right and a steep slope on the left side, making it important for players to hit their approach shots with accuracy.

The green itself is one of the most undulating on the course, making putting a challenge, especially when the pin is located on the top shelf.

The 18th hole at Augusta National has played a pivotal role in many memorable moments in Masters Tournament history, including the famous chip-in by Tiger Woods in 2005 that helped him secure his fourth green jacket.

Overall, the 18th hole at Augusta National Golf Club is a challenging and beautiful finishing hole that tests the skills of even the best golfers in the world.

“Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind. Always.”

Leave A Comment

SHARE
MORE LIKE THIS
4.7m followers
Share your favorite posts with us @TheSmokingChair on Instagram! 
ADVERTISEMENT